early student group

Exhibits

Davie and the University's Founding

Davie and the University's Founding

The creation of the University of North Carolina, with information on the life of its principal founder, William Richardson Davie.

Architectural Highlights of Carolina's Historic Campus

Architectural Highlights of Carolina's Historic Campus

Descriptions of buildings on historic McCorkle and Polk Places dating from Old East (1793), the first building erected on a public university campus, to the designs of Alexander Jackson Davis and the Beaux-Arts Wilson Library of 1929.

Carolina's Early Benefactors

Carolina's Early Benefactors

Role of early benefactors in strengthening the university from its founding during the 1790s to the critical donation by Mary Lily Kenan Flagler Bingham in 1917 that established the Kenan Professorships.

Antebellum College Life

Antebellum College Life

Student and faculty life before the Civil War, including the classical curriculum and faculty struggles to maintain student discipline.

Slavery and the University

Slavery and the University

The roles of African American slaves in early university life, from constructing the physical campus to serving students and faculty.

Women in the Early Years

Women in the Early Years

Women's efforts to support and advance the university's mission, work that began long before the first female students were admitted.

The Civil War Years

The Civil War Years

Campus debates about slavery and secession and the military experience of students and faculty who fought in the Civil War.

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

The university's struggles to survive in the aftermath of the Civil War and its role in the racial and political conflicts that swept the state and the region during that era.

The New South

The New South

Late nineteenth-century efforts to move the university beyond sectional disputes with a new mission and a new curriculum, designed to drive industrial development, urban growth, and educational progress.

African Americans and Segregation

African Americans and Segregation

The emergence of separate educational institutions for blacks and whites and faculty efforts to begin the serious and objective study of southern race relations.

Women and Coeducation

Women and Coeducation

Women's progress from a marginal to a central role in campus life and the achievements of the university's first female students, faculty, and administrators.

Building a Research University

Building a Research University

Carolina's early twentieth-century transformation from a small local college to a true university with highly trained professors, improved libraries and laboratories, and a university press.

Carolina’s Literary History

Carolina’s Literary History

Influence of drama professor Frederick Koch, novelist Thomas Wolfe, and English professor Louis Rubin on campus writers and the emergence of George Moses Horton, Walker Percy, Doris Betts, and Charles Frazier.

Frank Porter Graham

Frank Porter Graham

The career of one of the university's most memorable presidents, who sustained the university during the Great Depression and World War II, elevated its reputation through distinguished national service, and demonstrated a lifelong commitment to progressive social change.

The University in Crisis: The Great Depression and World War II

The University in Crisis: The Great Depression and World War II

Effects of the Great Depression and World War II on the university including severe budget cuts, consolidation of the state’s public universities, military training on campus, and the G.I. Bill.

Student Life at Carolina, 1890-1960

Student Life at Carolina, 1890-1960

A look at the changing student experience from 1890 to 1960, including the growth and transformation of the student body, the development of the university’s athletic teams, and the importance of the campus social scene.

Jewish Life at Carolina

Jewish Life at Carolina

Experience of Jews on campus including refugee scholars, student political activists, anti-Semitism, and the role of President Frank Porter Graham.

American Indians and Chapel Hill

American Indians and Chapel Hill

The university's collection of American Indian artifacts and documents, its interest in Indian folk culture, and the emergence of American Indian studies on campus.

African Americans and Integration

African Americans and Integration

The Civil Rights Movement both on and off campus and the university's first black students and faculty.

The Legacy of William C. Friday

The Legacy of William C. Friday

The work of the respected university leader known for his national leadership in higher education and his ability to resolve conflict during turbulent times.

Medical and Health Education

Medical and Health Education

The expansion of professional health training from small, semi-private programs to a sophisticated health affairs complex at the heart of the educational mission of the university and the health care system of the state.

Public Service and Professional Schools at Carolina

Public Service and Professional Schools at Carolina

Creation of professional schools beginning with law, medicine, and pharmacy in the nineteenth century and the emergence of the modern public service ethos shaped by President Edward Kidder Graham.

Teachers, Scholars, and Citizens:  Distinguished Carolina Faculty

Teachers, Scholars, and Citizens: Distinguished Carolina Faculty

An exhibit showcasing a few of Carolina's prominent faculty members, including brief biographical sketches, their contributions to society and scholarship, and the recognitions and awards they have received.

Names Across the Landscape

Names Across the Landscape

The stories of the individuals for whom some of the university's historic buildings are named.

Public Art at Carolina

Public Art at Carolina

A sampling of the monuments, sculptures, paintings, and other pieces of public art that can be discovered on the Carolina campus.

The Black Student Movement at Carolina

The Black Student Movement at Carolina

Throughout the more than four decades of the Black Student Movement's existence, the organization has brought to the forefront issues important to African American students at UNC.

The Speaker Ban Law at Carolina

The Speaker Ban Law at Carolina

On June 25, 1963, the North Carolina General Assembly passed "An Act to Regulate Visiting Speakers at State Supported Colleges and Universities," otherwise known as the Speaker Ban Law. This exhibit traces the history of the Speaker Ban Law and the efforts of UNC students, administrators, and faculty to fight this law and preserve freedom of speech and freedom of inquiry.

Student Organizations

Student Organizations

A look at some of the student organizations that have shaped student life and influenced the history of the university, including debating societies, student government, activist organizations, performance groups, honor societies, and Greek organizations.

Water at UNC-Chapel Hill

Water at UNC-Chapel Hill

From the "abundance of springs" described by founder William R. Davie to the conservation efforts of today, water has always been an important part of life on the UNC campus. This exhibit, inspired by the university's two-year "Water in Our World" theme, explores the role of water in UNC history.